Hanging Vintage Saris as Curtains Without a Curtain Rod

I’ve wanted to make some curtains for windows in my apartment out of some vintage Indian saris I’ve been stockpiling for a long time. I liked the look and idea of a window scarf or scarf valance but needed to be able to hang a window scarf / valance without a curtain rod or wall sconces since I am not allowed to hang rods over my windows or drill holes in the walls of my apartment.

scarf

I wanted it to kinda look like this only without a rod or sconces. Source

I decided to try to hang the saris by clipping metal drapery rings onto two inch nails and looping the saris through the holes in the rings.

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Crustless Colonial Pumpkin Pie Recipe

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It’s officially pumpkin season, and that means it’s also officially pumpkin pie season too.

I love homemade pumpkin pie with 100% of my heart, and one of my favorite ways to make a pumpkin pie is to stuff a pumpkin with fruit and spiced, sweetened milk and then bake it whole for several hours. It’s delicious.

Plus, it is actually closest to what colonists and pilgrims ate (as they did not always have ingredients like flour to make crust). This article discusses some of the ways pumpkin pies were made in the 1600s:

What were these “former Pumpkin Pies” like? At the time, pumpkin pie existed in many forms, only a few of which would be familiar to us today. [. . .] [A]n early New England recipe involved filling a hollowed-out pumpkin with spiced, sweetened milk and cooking it directly in a fire (an English version of the same preparation had the pumpkin stuffed with sliced apples).

I started making this version of pumpkin pie a few Thanksgivings ago, when some good friends of mine and I first made this recipe together. It was different, but tasty, and I’ve made it probably half a dozen times since then.

This post contains everything you need to know to make it too.

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Making & Sewing Embellished Patches on a Shirt to Upcycle It

I hate waste. I hate the idea of something going to a landfill that is perfectly useful.

And this leads me to do some weird stuff in the spirit of not wasting anything useful ever, including painting shoes with acrylic paint to cover up how scuffed they are, or hand-dying a shirt that I spilled chocolate ice cream all over and stained.

I’m the same way about holes in clothing.

I’ve never seen why you should get rid of a shirt with a hole in it, not if it’s a seam that’s come apart or a hem that’s gotten a bit sketchy. That stuff is easy to repair.

But holes on the surface of a shirt, you know, the looks like your dog chewed on it because it had food stuck to it and thought it was a treat kind of holes, those are a challenge.

That was until this weekend when my husband washed a new (new!) shirt of mine, and it got partially eaten by the washer. Then I turned my attention to how the shirt could be salvageable, even with holes in it.

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