Spring Wildflowers In Boise That Are Blue Or Should Be

The wildflowers here in the foothills outside Boise have been pretty spectacular this spring.

One of my favorite wildflowers — wild flax — has started blooming:

WILD BLUE FLAX IDAHO FRAMED VERS fixed one

Wild flax is amazing because it is blue, and I have a perpetual hard on for all blue flowers, like these alpine forget-me-nots. It is also amazing because it is one of many species first described by Meriwether Lewis on the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

Lupine, and other flowering members of the pea family, are also particular favorites of mine, mostly because so many of them are blue, as I love blue flowers with 100% of my heart. Longspur lupine has been everywhere the past few weeks:

A MOUTHFUL OF LUPINE IN THE EARTH FRAMED VERS fixed version

It is not blue. It does however smell amazing.  Also, the two-tone thing is pretty boss. It’s almost like being blue.

Cornflowers are starting to peep up one by one in mass numbers. By June, they’ll be turning everything into a wash of indigo. They are technically an invasive species. But apparently, they aren’t causing harm. So people have let them do what they want, which is mostly to go and be everywhere:

DEAD WOOD AND CORNFLOWERS FRAMED VERS fixed

They are pretty blue. Sometimes there is a pink or purple one that ruins it.

I’ve seen about half a dozen species of wild lily, including the large-flowered triplet-lily (it is totally blue) and Aase’s onion, a rare species found only in a few areas near Boise:

AESES ONION FRAMED VERS Fixed

The fact that it is so rare is sort of like its replacement for being blue.

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Spring Wildflowers In Boise That Are Blue Or Should Be

  1. Pingback: Well, It’s Wildfire & Forest Fire Season Again In The West | Lacrimosa Speaking

  2. Pingback: On The Importance Of Invasive Species | Lacrimosa Speaking

  3. Pingback: Beautiful & Deadly Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest (Also Blue Ones) | Lacrimosa Speaking

  4. Pingback: Wildflowers and Geological Features of Craters of the Moon National Monument (Photos) | Lacrimosa Speaking

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s